Start Your OWN Low Power FM Radio Station!

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start-radio-station1.pngThe LPFM Store has set up hundreds of low power FM and commercial FM radio stations across the United States, and also supports hundreds of other installations in other parts of the world. We can assist you or your organization to start a new Radio Station – either broadcasting on a low power basis, on a commercial full power FM frequency or the internet.  If you’re interesting in starting up a new LPFM radio station or an FM radio station, you’re in the right place!We are broadcasters ourselves, and are one of the very few  LPFM broadcasters that have made the progression to obtaining a full power FM frequency and operating commercially, enabling us to offer unparalleled support through all the stages of building and operating a radio station.

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The LPFM Store offers complete service to help you start up a licensed FM or AM radio station in the United States, or anywhere else in the world for that matter. We can take care of the

entire project – from licensing with the FCC to determining the best studio and antenna location, supplying all the equipment for the station, setting up the radio automation software, installing the studio equipment,  to providing training on how to use all the equipment. Simply stated – we help you with starting a FM radio station from start to finish! Lets get started!


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Tropospheric Ducting – What Happened to My Station?

What Happened to My Station?

Steve Callahan for Radio-Guide Magazine

It’s been good season for tropospheric ducting along the New England shore. You might not be familiar with the term “tropospheric ducting,” but you just might have experienced it and not known why.

We’re all familiar with the way that AM signals bounce at night and come down far from their point of origin. Anyone who has listened to the big 50,000 Watt clear channel AMs knows the thrill of hearing a distant AM on a regular radio. I was once surprised to hear WBZ from Boston while in a traffic jam one night in Atlanta, Georgia. An AM station’s “skywave” component reflects off the ionosphere as it cools down at night and the usually transparent-to-AM layer turns reflective and the AM signal comes back to earth far from it’s transmitter. Frequency and tower height influence the degree of skywave along with seasonal differences and weather conditions.

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LPFM Waiver on New EAS Reporting Duty Requested

In November 2017 LPFM  an advocacy group petitioned the FCC for relief to LPFM radio stations concerning meeting new multilingual EAS reporting requirements.

Citing low publicity surrounding an order adopted by the FCC in March 2016  and lack of input from LPFM stations, REC Networks has  filed a motion for either a blanket waiver or extension of time for LPFMs.

Currently the FCC has established that all EAS participants must report some EAS details to their State Emergency Communications Committees by Nov. 6. The information includes:

  • Description of any actions taken by the EAS participant to make EAS alert content available in languages other than English to its non-English speaking audiences; and
  • Description of any future actions planned by the EAS participant to provide EAS alert content in languages other than English to its non-English speaking audiences, as well as an explanation of the decision to plan/not plan such actions.

 

A separate reporting requirement due by Nov. 13, known as Form Three,  should detail the results of the most recent National EAS Test.

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Special FM Translator Window for AM Stations Open

As announced in October 2015 in the AM Order the commission had opened a special filing window for FM translators for use with AM radio stations. This is a two part window, with the first part open now for the next six months – ending July 28, 2016. The second window will be for three months opening July 29th and closing October 31st, 2016.

The current window is for Class C and D AM licensees only. The second round in July will be for AM stations of any class. Applications are processed on a first come first serve basis. So timing is of the essence. It is important to get started immediately.
During the window periods AM stations or permittees are being given the opportunity to acquire and relocate one FM translator station in the non reserved band – 92.1 – 107.9 Mhz. The translator may be relocated up to 250 miles.

Only one application may be filed by the AM station and may only be listed as the primary input on a single translator application.

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